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Garrison&Micromanagement.

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Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Good
Location: Germania Inferior
Posted on August 23, 2012 at 5:24 pm

Hey! First of all I want to say I tried the demo to this game a few days ago and immediately bought the game afterwards. Thanks for the fun game!

So, I'm playing Macedonia and I just conquered the Chaldician cities. However, to keep them from rebelling I have to install rather large garissons. Mercenary spearmen are rather expensive, so I'm considering sending Macedonian spearmen for garrison duty. However, that takes quite some micromanaging. What makes it even worse is that in case they rout, I'll have even more micromanaging to do. Seeing Athens likes to send naval invasions in, I can see this happening more than once :P

What's clever to do?

So yea, maybe a tip to the devs: It'd be great if you made the micromanaging in the game more fun and maneagable. For example, I think the game could use a better interface to see which unit is where, because the current one is rather cumbersome. It's quite an effort to get my army back in position after they've routed back to all their seperate home cities. Or when the AI captures my mines and execute all my slaves and I have to get all the slaves back into the mines again, hoping they don't revolt on the way.


Edit: Going to take the liberty to ask another question: What do the golden and red coins represent around the cities? Income and manpower?

Level 8 Human gamer
Alignment: Lawful good
Posted on August 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm

Not sure about the coins...don't think I've ever noticed.

Honestly, you picked a poor place to expand to first. Few mines with many cities that require more than a single spearman. Expanding into Paeonia, Illyria or Thessaly first will net you a lot more money and you won't need to bother with sending native or friendly units to garrison cities, Thessaly is especially useful for friendly cavalry (20 men per unit!), and a large number of friendly cities and mines.

As for micromanaging, you can do things to make it easier, keep peltasts and phalangites from the same city together and form armies from adjacent cities. e.g. Amphaxis, Parorbelia, Therme and Borboros. That way if you lose the entire army everything is in the same region. After getting tired of just what you mentioned I went to the trouble of reassigning my entire army (late in the game so I had a plananx from every Macedonian city) just to make my life easier.

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Good
Location: Germania Inferior
Posted on August 25, 2012 at 9:21 am

Once I got to conquering Chalcidice I already had all of Thessaly under my command. Made a truce with the Paeonians, because I've got no clue what's north of Paeonia but whatever is there, I'm sure the Paeonians will form a nice buffer state! But yes, Chalcadice is a very troublesome place with many cities and little farms and villages. Don't think the area's giving me much benefit at all besides establishing a route to that mining region.

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Lawful good
Location: German-speaking part of Europe
Posted on August 25, 2012 at 3:56 pm

As far as roleplaying is concerned, the truce was one of the worst things you could have done. Imagine the people, who have just "elected" you to the position of their king, hearing about a truce with a faction that constantly burned their crops, killed or stole their sheep and killed many Macedonians as well, and not only civilians. And the king that reconquered Upper Macedonia, fought bravely against the Illyrians and established a respectable and still expanding kingdom pays these hordes to leave him alone?

But all that is of course only important for a (wannabe) roleplayer like me, and there could evolve some advantages, too, but if you haven't already conquered the rest of the world, it is very probable that it would be less expensive to conquer the Paeonian cities and mines and to establish a little army for garrison purposes/to catch raiders.

I don't want to spoil anything, but you will have to go north to complete all your objectives. But I think it would be possible to avoid an attack of the Paeonians, because breaking a truce will permanently make all fractions more hostile, i.e. all cities under your rule will need more expensive garrisons.

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Good
Location: Germania Inferior
Posted on August 25, 2012 at 5:41 pm

Mhm, you make some interesting points. I do tend to roleplay a bit, but I'm not too savvy on this particular setting so I didn't think about it like that.

I also have a truce with Epirus at the moment which I'll have to break at one point. Suppose I'll save that for later, once I have subdued all my enemies in the Pellopenos. Also I think the mission north you have to do is further to the north east, but I might be mistaken. I don't plan on doing all the missions in the game, just the ones you have to do to complete the scenario. Usually with these kind of games it gets kind of stale once you grow too big, as you can just steamroll anyone.

So if I understand it correctly, breaking a truce will mean my cities will be more prone to revolt? Great :(

Thanks for your replies :)

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Lawful good
Location: German-speaking part of Europe
Posted on August 25, 2012 at 8:12 pm

Well, I'd rather complete the missions in Epirus quite fast, because with Alexander as king of Molossis, the hostility of the Athenian Empire will noticeably shrink (from 60 to 20, I think) and thus the number of the Athenian "amphibious assaults" will also become noticeable smaller. Another advantage of Epirus is that most cities are quite small and the hostility is REALLY low, so many of them won't need any garrison at all after you've torn down the city walls. Also, it provides another (perhaps useful) way into upper Illyria (especially because you probably don't want to travel through Paeonia) and has some sheep, although not many farms or mines.

There seems to be a way to circumvent the hostility penalty when breaking a truce, but as this could be considered an exploit and as I don't know, what you have to do for it, you'll have to find out yourself.

***SPOILER-SPOILER-SPOILER***

I'm not sure, but I think there is one objective that requires access to the lands directly adjacent to Northern Paeonia. But this could also be some secondary mission. I usually take a look at everything and make the missions that sound interesting. And given that Hegemony is such a great game, nearly every mission becomes interesting earlier or later. E.g. the conquest of Crete, totally optional, but challenging due to the fact that I invaded it from the west, and coming from the Peloponnese, my food reserves weren't that great... Well, I think, if I tell you that the two western cities of Crete have access to ONE farm and that Cretan Archers are quite good against desperate troops, you can imagine, what was so challenging. Sure, I could have connected them both to Pydna or Athens, having nearly full food stockpiles, but what would be left then? A steamroll, I think...

Level 9 Human gamer
Alignment: Chaotic good
Location: Chile
Posted on March 6, 2013 at 11:53 am

Hi,
First of all thanxs for a great game and a very interesting forum.
When conquering new lands, do you keep the walls? or do you dismantle them to keep the pops in order?
best regards...

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Lawful good
Location: German-speaking part of Europe
Posted on March 6, 2013 at 3:36 pm

I normally have some buffer zone of 1-3 walled cities at my frontier, while all the others are dismantled. Exceptions are originally unwalled cities like Sparta and Achea as well as cities that need the same amount of spearmen with and without walls (e.g. 30/10 garrison requirement). But also in the latter case their walls are torn down sooner or later. (I'm just too greedy to pay the - erm, was it 20 gold or something like that? - that are required for the upkeep of the walls.)
Coastal cities are also considered to be near the frontier as long as there is no naval garrison that protects the city. (e.g. the Corinthian gulf is considered unsafe unless all the coastal cities there are captured and secured by triremes in Naupactus. However, pay attention that cities like Antikyra and other cities without a port can also be targeted by amphibious assaults.

Level 8 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Reno
Posted on March 6, 2013 at 9:35 pm

far as costs go, native and allied spearman cost 15 gold. And your native towns have a higher population for recruits so normally as i conquer a town i have a native or allied town reinforce with spearman. Slaves will only revolt when out of sight so as long as they are in view they will not revolt.

Level 9 Human gamer
Alignment: Chaotic good
Location: Chile
Posted on March 7, 2013 at 6:22 pm

Thanx for the replies.I guess Im too cheap to pay the extra garrisons that I need when not dismantling the walls.
Playing sandbox as Sparta I dont have the native spearmen and mercs tends to be quite expensive.
Best regards...

Level 14 Extraplanar Programmer
Alignment: Chaotic good
Location: Toronto
Posted on March 9, 2013 at 3:48 am

That's okay, because historically Sparta didn't have walls :)

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: Lawful good
Location: German-speaking part of Europe
Posted on March 9, 2013 at 7:50 am

They had! Walls of men, of course. ;)