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Im So Confused

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Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Posted on April 3, 2012 at 1:33 pm

Ok i know that these are probably all easy things to understand, but i dont. I have read the manuals as much as possible but it still leaves alot to be desired in what im trying to figure out. So sorry if these are blatantly obvious answers.

1. i have tried the main campaign, and i end up getting stuck, i would say mid game, i really dont know how far i am because i never get passed it. I cant seem to balance military, i get to expanded, then when i try to guard all of my cities, but by the time i have enough men to defend from the invasions, i may only have 2 or 3 hoplites to attack with, and after that if i do take another city, i dont have enough to defend this one new city.

2. Is there a way to increase farm output? I find myself in sandbox mode, not having ANY food in my cities, none of them, i cant upgrade the roads, and my troops are continually starving, is there a way to make more farms, or upgrade them?

3. Morale, i know food plays alot of it, but when i am attacking i have superior numbers and a general, and good food, and they lose 5 or so guys and i lose 150 men to them surrendering when they only had one militia.

4. i know people have said crete and sparta are the best players in sandbox, but im not sure how to do it, i try and take some islands, everytime i do my men surrender, none of my cities have food, i cant get any troops cause my recruits stay at 0. I am just lost, i really want to play this game, it looks fun, i just cant do anything without losing. Please help

Level 6 Human Dad
Alignment: Good
Location: Iowa
Posted on April 3, 2012 at 5:54 pm

try playing the macedonian tutorial. It'll introduce you to all the subtle challenges of the game.

Level 13 Extraplanar Programmer
Alignment: Chaotic good
Location: Toronto
Posted on April 3, 2012 at 11:44 pm

Something we don't explain very well is the importance of tearing down your walls. Walls make you more capable of withstanding a siege, but they cost more, and they make your cities more likely to rebel, requiring you to keep a larger garrison to keep them safe. So if you tear down the walls for cities that are relatively safe from the enemy, you'll have more money and men to go around.

There's no way to make more farms, but how you place your roads can be really important. Sometimes it's useful to open the asset list and see where all your food is pooling and improve your distribution in that area. One example is Heraklea Lyncestis at the start of the Macedonian campaign, right after you defeat Bardylis. There's tonnes of food in this area, but with the basic roads, you can't distribute it fast enough, and the city quickly reaches its cap. This is one of the best places to buy an upgraded road.

For your native units, it might also be worth levelling up your logistics so you use food more efficiently. Logistics shrines will also help nearby cities, so make sure to capture those. (In the Macedonian campaign, there's one right next to Emathia.)

Food is the most important aspect of morale, so if you're starving, you definitely do not want to go into battle. That said, if you're fighting around a heroics shrine, it's usually best to take the shrine before anything else.

Crete and Sparta are my favourite factions in the sandbox, but they're definitely challenging, and I would suggest going through the campaigns first. Especially at the start, you need to be really careful with your troops, because if you lose them all it will take a while to get your recruits back. Make sure to put your troops inside cities when they're not being used, so they eat less, and make sure everything is connected by trade routes, so those islands get food. If you're playing as Crete, the hardest part will be to get a foothold on the mainland, whether that's in Sparta or Persia. Just focus on taking and holding one city. That city will be a big target for a while, and you won't have very many forces to fight off the enemy, but you can keep them distracted by harassing their cities; you don't need to take them, you just need to distract them while you get stronger. It's also important to plan at what time of the year you attack, because you're not really going to be able to ship in any extra soldiers in the winter.

Level 6 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Posted on April 4, 2012 at 11:17 pm

I lost at the campaign twice, but on my third playthrough I got a strategy that worked.

As you expand, keep in mind at the start you are at war with everyone, and look at your borders.

If you have a small border with a country you are at war with, maybe even just a couple narrow mountain passes, these are easily defensible wars. You can even focus on other fronts will leaving the border secure with just a few units.

If you share a LARGE border with a country you are at war with, try to get a truce if there are more than one of these you are at war with. Large borders make for very costly wars- it would be easier to pay even 300 or 400 for a truce rather than pay the money of sending massive amounts of troops and supplies there.

As for your morale problem- the speed at which your unit takes losses is just as, even more important, than the total number of losses. If a unit loses 5 guys all at once, it is worse than losing 20 over time- sometimes this can seem unwarrented and random, just be aware of it so at least you know the trouble of it.

As for food- I still have a bit trouble with this- at mid-autumn, take a look at the food level for all your cities, because this is when it is highest. Then go and look at which areas are going to need food the most! No point in feeding an unwalled town that is native to your faction. Make sure you put the stockpile on these towns low, and do it in autumn, because your supply lines should start shifting the surplusses as early as possible. Conversely, stockpile levels on the towns that will need them should be around 75 percent. I think this should have been better explained in the tutorial.

And this is getting long, but to address the problem in point 1: I prefer to military campaign in two stages. First, I'll send enough units to burn up their farms pretty dam good- even if I have the capability to take their cities as well, I play it safe, burn the crops and run. Why? Because taking cities can be hard gains to consolidate, and allows for a counter attack; instead, muck up their economy, let them spend units from other cities, and start draining food from other cities to meet a supply deficit. a half, or full year later, take the city, and you will find no effort to take it back, since they've already spent all their time rebuilding watchtowers and resuplying cities. If you just quickly blitz a single city, you limit the enemy losses just to what they had there, and that's no good.

Level 6 Human gamer
Alignment: Lawful evil
Location: Germany / Kassel
Posted on April 5, 2012 at 7:41 am

when u plan your campain take a look to the strat map and look for mines/farmes
don try to occupy many citys if u ha not much gold or supplys

Level 6 Human Dad
Alignment: Good
Location: Iowa
Posted on April 5, 2012 at 4:19 pm

Negotiating truces can really settle the game down to allow your faction to focus on it's grander strategic goals. Truces can really quiet down fronts which will free you from reacting to all the incessant raids.

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Posted on April 6, 2012 at 3:30 pm

I have truces with a couple people, but my biggest problem is, the enemy keeps showing up with hoplites, and i cant defend against them, my spearmen arent strong enough, and i cant build hoplites. so anytime i have an attacking army, i pretty much have to let them take my city and then ill just take it back.

Level 13 Extraplanar Programmer
Alignment: Chaotic good
Location: Toronto
Posted on April 7, 2012 at 4:36 am

I assume you're talking about the Macedonian campaign, since both Crete and Sparta can build hoplites.

As the Macedonians, it's essential that you make the most out of your phalangites. These guys are tanks, and can soak up huge amounts of damage. Pair them with some peltasts for ranged attack and you'll dominate.

The spearmen are rather weak in the field. The best use for spearmen is garrison duty, because they're the cheapest unit for their size.

Level 8 Human gamer
Alignment: Good
Posted on April 7, 2012 at 11:29 am

I have truces with a couple people, but my biggest problem is, the enemy keeps showing up with hoplites, and i cant defend against them, my spearmen arent strong enough, and i cant build hoplites. so anytime i have an attacking army, i pretty much have to let them take my city and then ill just take it back.

Be careful about making too many truces in the Macedonian campaign. If (when) you break them, the hostility of that faction will go up, which means that you will have to keep even more garrison units in the cities you take from them, to keep them from rebelling. I usually don't make any truces at all, in the Macedonian campaign.

Also, only build spearmen in those cities that need a permanent garrison (to keep them from rebelling), and don't ever move the spearmen out of those cities, except to capture sheep, defeated enemies, etc. They are extremely poor combat units. If the enemy keeps attacking specific cities, try putting a phalangite or two in each of those cities, but make sure that you still have enough phalangites to mount at least one offensive campaign (3 or 4 should be enough).

Once you take a few of the Paeonian cities, you can build barbarian cavalry, and if you build 2 or 3 of those, you can use them as a fast response force against invasions. They're not great against hoplites, though, so you'll want to use phalangites against those.

Level 7 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Posted on April 7, 2012 at 1:50 pm

those phalangites take over 80 population, i dont own any cities that big so im not sure on how to get them, and thats just one, i dont know how to get an army of them

Level 8 Human gamer
Alignment: Good
Posted on April 7, 2012 at 4:49 pm

They cost 80 gold. A full phalangite requires 60 population, but if you're playing the gold version (which I assume you are, since you're able to use truces), you don't have to actually have 60 population to build one. It will fill up over time. I usually recruit one phalangite in every Macedonian city with a size of less than or equal to 6, and two phalangites in larger cities.

Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on April 7, 2012 at 5:59 pm

The game is designed to encourage the use of historical military strategy and tactics with an emphasis on logistics.

Philip developed an elite core of maybe 2-3 thousand troops that were employed year round, training when they weren't on campaign. The mass of phalangites were stationed in regional cities, retained their regular jobs, but were involved in regular training to maintain their skills... probably similar to how the English paid their longbowmen a retainer to train for an hour or two everyday, while remaining in their respective communities. This provided the English with awesome archers to call upon when campaigning, just as Philip had reliable phalangites to mobilize when campaigning.

In the game this elite core is represented by the Companion cavalry and the Hypaspist infantry. Take them wherever you plan to seriously campaign.

Use your native Macedonian population to build phalangites. Build just enough Macedonian scout cavalry for reconnaissance and raiding and maybe build one or two Macedonian peltasts for ranged support. For your army of conquest, you can start with one or two phalangites. With the addition of the Hypaspists, which you get for completing an objective, you have a solid combined arms army for conquest. Add catapults as soon as you can, as they make sieges a lot easier. The rest of your support cavalry and ranged troops should be mercenaries.

Select a limited number of frontier cities to be bases and keep those cities walled. Tear down walls everywhere else, although I tend to keep my native Macedonian cities walled, especially when I am leaving them without a garrison (no revolt risk). Station a phalangite brigade at each one of your frontier cities where you expect enemy activity and always maintain at least one squadron of cavalry for scouting, flanking and pursuit after battle. Try to stockpile food at these cities, even if you have to carry some of it in with workers. Then, where you are ready to campaign in a specific region, you will have a walled city to act as a base of operations, with stockpiled food and regional troops to add to your elite core when it arrives in the area. If your campaign objective includes capturing a city, make sure you have a siege train (2 catapults should be enough) that can reach the enemy city shortly after you have cleared the area of mobile enemy forces.

In battle, pin down enemy heavy infantry with your phalangites and the Hypaspists. The Companion cavalry can survive if forced to take on hoplites by themselves, but are much better when used as a flanking hammer to crush enemy heavy infantry, pinned against an anvil of phalangites. If you are forcing your way through a narrow mountain pass, try to back up your battleline troops with some ranged fire added by peltasts.

Only build spearmen from your mercenary population, and only when you need them for garrison duty as they are easily defeated by hoplites. Add mercenary peltasts and some of the better mercenary cavalry and the occasional mercenary hoplite, where you need them to backbone your battleline where you can't station a phalangite brigade.

Don't forget to send out scouting/raiding parties (reconnaissance in force) to scoop up enemy sheep and capture watchtowers to give you early warning of enemy reactions.

Think like a military commander:
-Do enough reconnaissance to know your enemies strengths and weaknesses.
-Take enough supply with you on campaign or plan to quickly overwhelm an area that is rich in food.
-Mobilize or plan for reinforcements to shore up your frontline forces if needed.
-Make sure you have the depth to pull weakened units from the front, so that they can more easily take replacements.

Level 6 Human Dad
Alignment: Good
Location: Iowa
Posted on April 7, 2012 at 9:32 pm

LDAjim
Wow. This is a very impressive strategic concept/plan. I'm almost w/the finished w/the macedonian campaign and your concept for winning is flawless. You don't have to answer, but are you a player or are you employed by Longbow? I state this question because your strategy is articulated very well and your concept is very comprehensive. Impressive.

Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on April 8, 2012 at 9:47 am

I'm the lead designer, so basically, it's my interpretation of ancient warfare that is being implemented in Hegemony.

From the beginning, I was interested in making a wargame that would play out on one huge map, with a focus on logistics and the many minor battles and skirmishes that occurred in real warfare, instead of focusing on the rare large pitched battle (the ones that make the history books).

I wanted units to be built upon a cadre that would reform back in the units home city if the unit was defeated in battle and thus, avoid permanently losing elite units, which I had found frustrating in games.

I also wanted cavalry to function in a more realistic role (scouting, flanking, pursuit after combat) than is usual in games, etc., etc.

That said, the implementation decisions and details of the design have been an ongoing dialog, with all members of the team having their say... mainly between Rob, Rick, Philippe and me.... often more of a friendly fight at times, but all for the best... .Clarissa and Britt are newer to LDA and have been wading into the fray more recently.

-I designed the map, placed the cities and pathfinding regions in "Philip/Gold/Rome" and did the objectives for the "Philip" campaign. I'm less involved in the details of "Rome".

-As Rob does most of the game programming, he is really the lead designer in terms of programming the specific mechanics of the game. i.e. Rob has the final say on whether a feature can be implemented in code or not and makes decisions to modify features so that they'll work as code.

-Rick designs and codes the website and store and helps Rob when and where he can. Rick also writes the cut scenes and took over the objectives for the Peloponnesian War and is doing them for "Rome".

-Philippe does all of the animations, some modeling and textures.

-Clarissa now does most of the modeling and some of the textures and did the 2-D art for "Philip".

-Britt is the newest member of the team and has taken over the 2-D art, does some textures and sculpts (beautifies) the map for "Rome".

It's not quite as simple as all of that, but that is a basic breakdown of our small team here at LDA.

Our goal is to make the Hegemony games an accurate, enjoyably playable, interpretation of military history. We opened the door with "Philip", refined it with "Gold" and will try to make it even better with "Rome". We'll keep on trying to get it right.

Player support makes it all possible. Thank you all!

Jim

Level 6 Human Dad
Alignment: Good
Location: Iowa
Posted on April 8, 2012 at 3:58 pm

Jim and the Hegemony Team
I'm flattered that you and your collegues respond so well to posts in this forum. I guess its a perk of owning a game from a small company. I felt I had to respond after I read the last sentence of your post. You stated that: "we'll keep on trying to get it right." I wanted to praise your ambition, and also state that you have already "got it right". I know you and the team are not satisfied, maybe not even close to satisfied...but what you've created in HGOLD is special.
You probably don't need to hear this anymore from the people but I wanted to share a short relevant story. I had not purchased a PC game in 4 years prior to buying Hegemony. As I was researching the game pre-purchase, I listened to a 45 minute pod cast on this very websight. The pod cast consisted of 3 gentleman, and I believe only one was a member of the Longbow team. Toward the end of pod cast one of the gentleman surmised his overall impression and verdict of the game and he stated that; "Hegemony Gold represented a paradigm shift in gaming"! (this may be a para-phrase) Paradigm is one of my favorite words:) Anyway when I heard that statement, and when I combined that with the research I had already done on HGOLD I was sold...and I promptly bought the game. I haven't been disappointed...though the AI needs work.
Anyway I imagine you and your team may not quite agree with that lofty statement, but I believe that gentleman "may" be correct. I wish you all the luck with your uber-refinement in HROME. It may truly be a new paradigm event...and it may be the beginning of significant success for you and your team. I wish you all the luck...and I think you may be building up enough momentum to potentially reach a lot of gamers.
Matt