Skip navigation

Strategy and Combined-Arms Tactics in Hegemony

Forum NavigationHome > Forum Index > News > Strategy and Combined-Arms Tactics in Hegemony
Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on July 30, 2007 at 2:23 pm

The essence of Combined-Arms Tactics can be defined as having different troop types fighting together in a coordinated manner to achieve a better result than if they fought without proper organization. A well executed combined-arms attack can allow a force to weaken, envelope and decisively crush the enemy army while taking minimal losses. When used defensively, Combined-Arms Tactics can significantly reduce casualties and enable a well ordered retreat.

When applying combined-arms tactics to ancient warfare, heavy infantry form a battleline to advance and engage the enemy in melee combat while light infantry use missile fire to lower morale and disrupt the enemy ranks. Cavalry protect the flanks and threaten to surround the enemy and pursue after victory. Catapults can be added to support river crossings, counter enemy siege defenses or to weaken the enemy in field battles. Effective combined-arms is all about coordinating the various troop types available for each battle.

In Hegemony: Philip of Macedon we make it easy to conduct combined-arms tactics. Brigades can be grouped to approach enemies in ordered formations and can be given complex movement paths with precise adjustments available to maximize their effectiveness. Your heavy infantry will maintain proper contact with other brigades in their battleline group while you select and peel off light infantry to skirmish and support. You can also easily plot maneuvers for your cavalry to flank or envelop your enemies.

A major feature in Hegemony: Philip of Macedon is that battles aren't defined by a fixed start and endpoint. Battles are simply the point on the map where any clash of arms occurs. In this context, most of your battles will be conducted by small raiding parties, reconnaissance units or advance-forces probing to establish forward bases. Large battles will evolve over time as the conduct of war brings your forces into further contact with the enemy.

When invading an enemy controlled region, larger battles will occur where the enemy chooses to (or is forced to) make a stand. Enemy response will vary. For example, an enemy that refuses battle and retreats when your advancing force is larger may choose to fight when their harvest is threatened. Conversely, when defending your own territory, do you fight at the first opportunity or do you skirmish and pull back until you've gained the high-ground or have gathered a larger force?

Siege warfare in Hegemony: Philip of Macedon involves more than just attacking an enemy fortification. A siege can be viewed as a greatly prolonged battle occurring at a predefined location requiring support troops to control an entire region for the duration of combat. Some of the important decisions when planning a siege include:

* How do I maintain adequate food for my besieging forces while preventing the enemy from replenishing his city?
* How much reconnaissance do I need to watch for other enemy armies?
* How many patrols will I need to defend my supply lines with?
* What if the enemy sorties out from their city?
* How many troops will it take to seal the enemy in without having so many that feeding them becomes a problem?
* Can I shorten the siege with a few well placed bribes?
* What kind of response will the faction controlling this city have to my bribe attempt?

Beyond the battle and the siege, general strategic questions include:

* Should I mount a full invasion and conquer that region to secure resources?
* When I invade, how can I get more food into the region so that I can bring in more troops?
* Can I get some of that food from the enemy by raiding or attacking their harvest?
* Is it better to send in an advance-force to secure a base of operations and stockpile supply or should I risk a lightning campaign with more tenuous supply?
* When I conduct any large-scale campaign, how will I protect my other frontiers from enemy raids or invasion?
Finally, how does strategy tie into combined-arms tactics and vice-versa?

In Hegemony: Philip of Macedon , if you arrange enough food and the right mix of troop types in a given region you can organize and execute effective campaigns utilizing combined-arms tactics. Conversely, effective tactics will result in fewer losses, enabling you to conduct your strategic plans without undue interruption

Level 13 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Posted on August 1, 2007 at 9:46 pm

*looks at spartan lays siege pic* the spartans are giants :shock: :o

Level 13 Human Unaffiliated Game Maker
Alignment: Chaotic
Location: England
Posted on August 2, 2007 at 4:43 am

Omg, tiny cities! Nice tactics thing though...

Level 13 Human gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Posted on August 2, 2007 at 6:03 am

Jim , from the 2nd picture it reminds me of tattics , if i have my army facing one way and someone attacks from the rear, does my army get penitalised?

Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on August 2, 2007 at 6:52 am

The cities and buildings are at a different scale than the units. The triremes are a smaller scale than the troop units. The troops don't tower over the cities like they do in CIV and although they enter cities they don't walk around inside them.

There are always trade-offs in scale, especially when putting everything on one map.

Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on August 2, 2007 at 6:56 am

Troops on higher ground will have an advantage. Troops that are flanked or surrounded and attacked in the rear are in big trouble. Troops that have friends around get a moral boost, etc.

Tactics and battlefield maneuver are very important.

Level 13 Human Unaffiliated Game Maker
Alignment: Chaotic
Location: England
Posted on August 4, 2007 at 4:04 pm

Nn9, even if it was not programmed in a game to penalize units which are aproached from the rear, they would be penalized just by what is going on.

For example, if cavalry aproach from the front then the infantry can spear and repel them while the archers fire at them from behind, however if they run around to the back, then the archers will be run down while the infantry have to try and run to protect them.

I charge down spearmen from behind in LotR: BfME :lol: It's easy enough to figure out.

Hey theres a point, can we run infantry down like that with cavalry?

Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on August 4, 2007 at 5:54 pm

Yes, infantry can be run down by cavalry if they are caught from behind or are light infantry.

But, it won't be that easy to run down peltasts, even though they are light infantry. The quality of the troops and whether or not they have a leader with them will make a significant difference in otherwise close situations.

Spearmen such as hoplites will turn to face an attempted attack from behind, so the cavalry will best wait until the spearmen are engaged from the front by other spearmen, hoplites or phalangites.

Level 13 Human Unaffiliated Game Maker
Alignment: Chaotic
Location: England
Posted on August 7, 2007 at 5:07 am

Cool. Hey, come to think of it, can you accidentaly run down your own units :/ That would be....tough...

Level 21 Extraplanar gamer
Alignment: True neutral
Location: Toronto
Posted on August 7, 2007 at 7:26 am

They won't cause damage, but friendly units will cause interference and traffic jams to some degree if they plow through each other.