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Author Topic:   Serverrate...increasing and decrease does what?
666
Member
posted August 28, 2003 02:16 PM            
The serverrate in the dedicated.cfg is defaulted to 3000. I am assuming that this is frames per second, fps. I have to increase the serverate in order to accommodate the 85 weapon server. Just wondering what are the possible ramification to dialup and he general users of the server?

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SA
Member
posted August 28, 2003 09:58 PM         
quote:

The serverrate in the dedicated.cfg is defaulted to 3000. I am assuming that this is frames per second, fps.


No, it is the bandwidth rate in bytes/sec that the server sends data to each connected client. If you increase it beyond the maximum rate at which dialup modem users receive data, they will be unable to play without getting buffer overruns, i.e. their games will suck big time with the tanks warping etc.

That value may be the maximum data rate and not the constant data rate, but even if it is just the maximum, by lifting the ceiling that high, you still risk flooding dialup modem users.

What makes you think you have to increase this just because there are more weapons? A large number of clients connected to the server would necessitate increasing the rate for a smoother game, but just having more weapon choices would not since the same number of weapons is spawned in the map regardless of how many possibilities there are.

[This message has been edited by SA (edited August 28, 2003).]

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666
Member
posted August 29, 2003 01:12 AM            
Well SA...I needed to ask the question to one, understand what it is, and two let Ras know that he will need to decrease the serverate. We were testing it at 4500 and it was still jumpy during the test. I will get it up and running at 10K now to see if it kills dialup. If it does then I will lower the rate. I am just the messenger...don't kill me.

Thanks for answer the question.

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Robo Jaws
Member
posted August 29, 2003 04:00 PM            
Hi 666,
As I understand it the serverrate is the amount of
data (in bytes) that is sent to each player per second
so make sure you server / internet connection can
handle the incresed traffic.
take a look at http://home.austin.rr.com/treadmarks/ServerInfo.htm
for dedicated.cfg examples.

------------------
TM Tank drivers licence applied for

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Irascible
Member
posted August 30, 2003 03:18 PM            
I'm guessing you saw the replies in the other thread SA. Just to repeat the most relevant piece of information from it: CyberCannon and MelonCracker both played the 85 server on many occasions without any trouble from the 10000 setting. That happens to be TM's default setting.

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666
Member
posted September 03, 2003 12:25 AM            
That is not true Ras...harmless did the math in a DMF post. I will post it here once I get my computer up. When you see the math it will shock you. You would need a T2 line or better to have 10 players on and a serverate above 3000 with 10 fps setting.

I promise to get back on this.

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666
Member
posted September 04, 2003 01:17 AM            
sent harmless an email...hopefully he will get back to us soon with the math.

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harmless
Member
posted September 04, 2003 06:02 PM            
why oh why did i ever major in math

ok, here is a link to the DMF thread where this was all discussed. go here for all of the discussion.

server rate discussion

this is the math that i did for server rate and fps:

ok... i have cable at home....
128,000 bits per seconds upstream / 8 gives 16,000 Bytes per second.
16,000 x .856 = 13,696 Bytes per second
13,696 / 5 players max = 2,739.2 Bytes per second
2,739.2 / 5 fps = 547.84 Bytes per second
=> 536 would be the number used for a server rate.

ok... a local LAN party...
100,000,000 bits per second / 8 gives 12,500,000 Bytes per second.
12,500,000 x .856 = 10,700,000 Bytes per second
10,700,000 / 20 players max = 535,000 Bytes per second
535,000 / 25 fps = 21,400 Bytes per second
=> 21,440 would be the number used for the server rate since 536 x 40 = 21,440
[[close enough to 21,400?]]

what's interestinig, even if i had a T1, doing the numbers don't really get much better....
1,544,000 bits pers second upstream / 8 gives 193,000 Bytes per second
193,000 x .856 = 165,208 Bytes per second
165,208 / 10 players max = 16,520.8 Bytes per second
16,520.8 / 10 fps = 1,652.08 Bytes per second
=> using 1608 for the server rate
or if i wanted only 5 players max...
then the server rate could be 3216 with 10 fps...

hope this helps out.

toodles,
harmless

------------------
mikey,
may peace doggedly
follow you.

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KiLlEr
Member
posted September 04, 2003 07:08 PM            
This is the original thread:
http://206.222.78.140/ubb/Forum2/HTML/002939.html


With the calculations in hand, keep 1 thing in mind. TM dosn't use all of the alloted bandwidth continuously. If you have a stock server, you can in fact have more people on than what you calculated for, since not all the bandwidth is being used. The computation is a guide and gives you a good place to start.

-- edit --

For example, if you calculate for 5 players, you get the maximum amount per player TM can send. If you are running a stock server, you may be able to squeeze 2 or even 3 more players on with little lag. It all depends on how much data TM is generating. ON the other end of the spectrum, if you have a server like Armageddon which maxs out bandwidth real quick, that calculation is an unbreakable law.

[This message has been edited by KiLlEr (edited September 05, 2003).]

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666
Member
posted September 05, 2003 12:57 AM            
explain the .856 please...it will not be apparant.

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harmless
Member
posted September 05, 2003 04:51 AM            
a quote from another post...

The easiest thing to do is find out your upload rate and take 85.6%
(leaving 14.4% for overhead). Then divide the result by the maximum number
of players you want to allow. Then take this result and guesstimate a netrate
and fps that (when multiplied together) is equal to or less than this value.
end of quote...
[[and it's nice if the server rate is a multiple of 536]]

overhead is the result of how packets are sent over the internet using TCP/IP.
i'm a bit rusty in this area, but the basics should be right...
anything sent out over the wires will be divided up into packets. each packet has a data portion and other portions devoted to sending address, receiving address, checksums, segment order, and various other things that TCP/IP needs to send and receive.
the reason for the using 85.6% is to find the best server rate taking into account only the data protions of each packet that is sent and received.

i do believe this is also why the number 536 is used.

you can find endless confusion and debate over what MTU (maximum transfer unit) your computer should use. MTU is the size of the packet that your computer puts and sends out over the internet.
windows default is 1500 bytes for MTU, because windows sets this value for an ethernet LAN. but this might not be the best MTU value for going out over the internet. i've seen many ADSL forums where the MTU value on your computer needs to be set at 1492 bytes or 1490 bytes in order to use a particular ADSL modem. why, i don't know, but that is the consenses at these forums.

i've seen other forums where people are told to set their MTU value to 576 bytes if they are on a dialup modem.

why 576 bytes.... well, there is some X.25 standard out there and (at one time) most internet routers could only accept 576 bytes as the largest packet they could receive and send out. this means that if your computer has an MTU value of 1500, then you are sending out 1500 byte packets, and when they get to these routers, the routers have to spend time and break down your 1500 byte packets into 576 byte size packets before they can be processed.

but this 576 byte packet includes both a data portion and the address / checksum / segment / etc portion (ie overhead) ... so in the calculation, that is why 536 is used ... to take into account only the data portion of each packet.

anyway, my server at home, the hallsted i am TM server uses a server rate of 3000, fps 10 and i have changed the MTU settings on my NT4 box so that it is 576.

and it seems to works just fine.

toodles,
harmless

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666
Member
posted September 05, 2003 11:31 AM            
Where do I go to set the MTU of the server???

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harmless
Member
posted September 05, 2003 10:24 PM            
best thing to do is to let a good program do it for you, since you would be messing around in the registry.

go download cablenut. it's a neat little freeware program that will do these things for you.

http://www.cablenut.com/

toodles,
harmless

------------------
mikey,
may peace doggedly
follow you.

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