|
Author Topic:   Insulin Pump Warning :)
wolfman
Member
posted February 14, 2004 10:08 AM            
Here it is Saturday morning and I am finally at home again - finally checked out of the hospital Friday Night *2000 EST. Last Sunday night on the 8th I had to go to the Emergency Room here - thank the Lord that my wife came back from visiting a girlfriend and babysitting overnight. When she arrived home I was in a delirium, projectile vomitus (had been for hours), stuttering, slurring, shakes, collapsing into walls, etc.
I was picked up at the house by amubulance after she called 911 cause of how sick I was. I am sure some of you know that I am a Type 1 Diabetic on an insulin pump - seems as of now that the pump went into a severe malfunction and the built in fail safes did not work. When checked in to the hospital I had a Blood Sugar Reading of over 900 - my wife was told (as was I) that I should of been dead. Numerous med staff there had never see a number that high without death resulting. Well, I made the med books I guess. Through God's love I survived and the fact that my wife took care of me and called the ambulance regardless of what I was telling her. As she told me later, I was telling her everything is fine and I will go to the Dr. on Monday - Obviously everything wasn't - she said she started to not even hear me but a voice inside tellin her to get me to the hospital ASAP - thankfully she did.
If you or anyone is on a *is*tro*** Insulin pump have em checked out immediately. It was a weird case of timing on the problems on the pump at that time that I woked up almost already delirious that morning. I know u work in the Med Field Sue (kind of think of u as TM's mom in a very loving/ respectful way } and definitely wanted you to pass this on to any you know - some of their pumps are already on a voluntary recall as opposed to mandatory.
Just wanted to get this info out. Love to all my buds out there. John and Belinda

IP:

wolfman
Member
posted February 14, 2004 10:11 AM            
I know I got a bit rambling on the previous note - just want everyone to know that let those around you - friends and family near and far - that you care about - know that you love them. I am 39 and to have this happen out of the blue for no reason was really mind blowing. Spent a lot of time this week being philosophical I guess while I was being saved. Peace and love to all. JT

IP:

Bonzo Dog
Member
posted February 14, 2004 11:31 AM            
You wanna start lookin after yourself a bit more Wolfman, wouldn`t want to lose ya m8. Should have been on the blower long time before.

Good to hear you still got a few frags left in ya : ).

IP:

=DNX= Matrix
Member
posted February 14, 2004 12:40 PM            
Ya better not die on us man .. or ill kill ya !! :\

Glad everything worked out ok.

IP:

Blue n Gold Sue
Member
posted February 14, 2004 01:24 PM            
John/Wolfman-
Just a few questions for you. First off, what is the name of that insulin pump? Hard to read with those asterisks in the name, and I am not familiar with the brands of pumps out there.
Second question (and I'm not blaming or anything, just wondering how this happened so fast), even with being on the pump, don't you regularly check your blood glucose levels? Like every morning and evening? I have several friends on pumps and I'm pretty sure they still check their levels as a safety measure.
A former boyfriend of mine was diagnosed with a glucose level of close to 600, which was also very impressive. Most monitors won't read much higher than that, so yours must have been from an actual lab test.
Glad you are okay now. Your hemoglobin levels can give some indication of how long the malfunction had been going on. It's very scary that this happened to you, and a very special Valentine's Day for you two sweethearts, that your wife was there for you when you really needed it!

IP:

wolfman
Member
posted February 14, 2004 07:12 PM            
Disetronix - didn't know if it would cause problems spelling it out before - we'll know now. Yes, I do check my sugars constantly and it seems that the problems started right before I went bed on Saturday - red Hi - did the protocol they had to get that lower etc. Unfortunately, by the time I woke up early Sunday I was already in a moving delirious state. Moving around and all but not really there - going on overdrive or instinct so to speak which didn't really help and I went downhill the rest of the day - delirium only got worse. Found out after the fact that I had bounced and hit into various walls. Projecticle vomitus found out was a plus - hospital said if I had been able to keep anything down - was mainly water and a little wattered down juice and other non caloric drinks. My A1C from before had been 7.1. - a bit high - but had been so sick with systemic infections they figured I was doing ok. My Primary Internal had seen me the previous Monday and done full quarterly work and I am sure that was fine or better too or he would of called me late week when they got the results in. Seems to have been a matter of bad bad timing and happenstance - faults in the monitor occurred overnight while sleeping - when I awoke already into the delirium. Sugar checks I do 3 to 8 times a day depenging on what I do that day. In the entirety of the things that occurred, and the quickness, the Dr. and even my wife - bless her heart -felt the pump went berserk and the med staff backed her up on all this. Seems that all this happenening - border line coma, uncontrollable white blood cell count -27k plus - fear that I had inhaled the vomitus - so I was on liquid anti biotics almost all weeks, Potatsium out of a whack, etc. Doing much better now, just exhausted and now finding out next week will be more MRI's or at least an Angiogram to check my brain for stroke or aneurism (old old stroke yearsssssssss ago - but they want to check a small 3 mm piece of vein in my head). One of the best Neuro Surgeons here in town consulted and wants to see me first thing next week for the Angio gram - so prayers from all would be most appreciated. Remember all, communicate, validate and appreciate the ones you love TODAY. God saved me and I am thankful. Sue, most of the medical staff told me that if she had waited a few hours getting me in I would of been dead. That the sugar level was higher than they ever had seen. They stated that it most probably would of killed me. I am so thankful for this St. Valentine's Day. Home with the light of my life and the one who helped save me I will check on the hemoglobin levels to see what light that sheds on all this. I do check the sugars 4 plus times a day. (And I didn't take anything as criticism = you're just asking the questions that need to be asked - my A1C nowhere near to even cover this type of level. Thanks Mom and any ideas please let me know.
John

IP:

Teulk
Member
posted February 14, 2004 08:18 PM            
Glad to see that your are still with us. Sounds very SCARY. Hope everything calms down a bit for you.
Your on the prayer list as of RIGHT NOW!
And here's a little somethig passed my way that I should like to send your way...hopefully, the admins will let it slide--special case and all---all things considered.


> Perhaps it's the quiet solitude that comes with being the first to
rise, or
maybe it's the unbounded joy of not having to be at work. Either way,
the
first few hours of a Saturday morning are most enjoyable.
A few weeks ago, I was shuffling toward the basement ham-shack with a
steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the morning paper in the
other.
What began as a typical Saturday morning turned into one of those
lessons
that life seems to hand you from time to time. Let me tell you about
it. I
turned the dial up into the phone portion of the band on my ham radio
in
order to listen to a Saturday morning swap net.
Along the way, I came across an older sounding chap, with a
tremendous
signal and a golden voice. You know the kind; he sounded like he
should be
in the broadcasting business. He was telling whomever he was talking
with
something about "a thousand marbles." I was intrigued and stopped to
listen
to what he had to say.
"Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you're busy with your job. I'm! sure
they
pay you well but it's a shame you have to be away from home and your
family
so much. Hard to believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or
seventy
hours a week to make ends meet. Too bad you missed your daughter's
dance
recital" he continued. "Let me tell you something that has helped me
keep a
good perspective on my own priorities."
And that's when he began to explain his theory of a "thousand
marbles."
"You see, I sat down one day and did a little arithmetic. The average
person
lives about seventy-five years. I know, some live more and some live
less,
but on average, folks live about seventy-five years.
"Now then, I multiplied 75 times 52 and I came up with 3900, which is
the
number of Saturdays that the average person has in their entire
lifetime.
Now, stick with me, Tom, I'm getting to the important part. It took
me until
I was fifty-five years old to think about all this in any detail", he
went
on, "and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight hundred
Saturdays."
"I got to thinking that if I lived to be seventy-five, I only had
about a
thousand of them left to enjoy. So I went to a toy store and bought
every
single marble they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores
to round
up 1,000 marbles. I took them home and put them inside a large, clear
plastic container right here in the shack next to my gear."
"Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble out and thrown it
away.
I found that by watching the marbles diminish, I focused more on the
really
important things in life. There is nothing like watching your time
here on
this earth run out to help get your priorities straight.
"Now let me tell you one last thing before I sign-off with you and
take my
lovely wife out for breakfast. This morning, I took the very last
marble out
of the container. I figure that if I make it until next Saturday then
I have
been given a little extra time. And the one thing we can all use is a
little
more time."
"It was nice to meet you Tom, I hope you spend more time with your
family,
and I hope to meet you again here on the band. This is a 75 Year old
Man,
K9NZQ, clear and going QRT, good morning!"
You could have heard a pin drop on the band when this fellow signed
off.
I guess he gave us all a lot to think about. I had planned to work on
the
antenna that morning, and then I was going to meet up with a few hams
to
work on the next club newsletter.
Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife up with a kiss. "C'mon
honey, I'm
taking you and the kids to breakfast." "What brought this on?" she
asked
with a smile. Oh, nothing special, it's just been a long time since
we spent
a Saturday together with the kids. And hey, can we stop at a toy
store while
we're out? I need to buy some marbles..."

Sorry for the length--didn't know how to shorten it up--hopefully, the point is made..

[This message has been edited by Teulk (edited February 14, 2004).]

IP:

wolfman
Member
posted February 14, 2004 08:37 PM            
The Marbles made the point. Brought a tear to my eye and reflects closely on what I have been thinking on since Sunday. Thanks Bud. John

IP:

Blue n Gold Sue
Member
posted February 15, 2004 03:26 AM            
WOW, I am impressed that this happened overnight!
The stroke thing seems to be common. My former jobshare partner was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 12, after having a small stroke, too.
5 days of antibiotics for a possible aspiration pneumonia sounds about right for that diagnosis (at least for babies).
On the positive side, at least the pump gave you too little insulin. If it had given you too much, you wouldnt' have had much leeway there. I'm very glad things went the way they were supposed to go! Insulin helps drive potassium into cells, so when your insulin level went out of whack, I can see why your potassium was off. Unfortunately that is also what controls your heart beating appropriately (causes "inverted T waves with high K levels) so being in the hospital and being monitored was the very best thing for you. White blood cells react rapidly in stress cases. The blood vessels are lined with inactive White Blood Cells (WBC) and anything that the body considers a risk, causes the WBCs to leave the lining and go "hunting" for the trouble spot (called demargination). I know insulin plays a part in all this, too, but that knowledge of physiology is very deeply buried in my brain. (btw, when Ben was born, his WBC count was in excess of 45K and he was just fine, so take those numbers with a grain of salt)
I enjoyed the marble story. It does give some graphic evidence of our time on earth, of which we all need reminding once in a while.
Best of luck to you, John, for your future tests and future health. And also for your new pump to NOT MALFUNCTION!

[This message has been edited by Blue n Gold Sue (edited February 15, 2004).]

IP:

wolfman
Member
posted February 15, 2004 10:20 AM            
Thanks Sue - amen to the last part of your reply. Just really freaked me out when we heard from the med staff - EMT's, ICU Nurses, etc that if I had not been brought in that night - that I would of been dead by morning. Has given a huge wake up call re: a lot of things in my life at this point. Thanks for all your info and your's and others kind words. Please add me to the prayers of all till the Angio gram etc done next week - one of the top Neuro Surgeons is doing the procedure. Thanks again all. And remember, Let those you love KNOW it now and enjoy your time and love with them now - so that no one ever has regrets. Peace
John

IP:

Dudymas
Member
posted February 23, 2004 06:11 PM            
Well, no matter how little or how much you've been around, you'd better know I'll keep a bit of you... of everyone from TM. I have you in my prayer sights and I know God will bless you. Sorry I only now read this. I'm a scatter brained fellow, but I hope you know that even if you don't finish putting your marbles in a jar, you've already got a legacy that spans across us all. I can't say how much I know you, but each day you're more immortalized in my spirit. Take care, and thank you. If anything, you've reminded me of something I easily forget. We should live our lives like each day could be our last. It's not a sad way to live... but an encouraging way. You've blessed me by keeping this in my mind. What I find odd is that with all the death around I've become desensitized to, it takes something like this to make me think twice about how I live. The Lord bless you and keep you.

[This message has been edited by Dudymas (edited February 23, 2004).]

IP:

wolfman
Member
posted February 27, 2004 11:36 AM            
Hiyas
Wanted to thank you all from me and mine for your kind words, thoughts, and prayers.
Frag ya later buds
JT

IP: