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Author Topic:   Flag Etiquette
coax
Administrator
posted September 26, 2001 05:41 PM            
Flag Etiquette
The flag should not be draped over the
hood, top, sides or back of a vehicle, train
or boat.
When the flag is displayed on a car, the
staff should be fixed firmly to the
framework or clamped to the right fender.
The flag is supposed to be displayed
only from sunrise to sunset. It can be
displayed at night only if a light shines on
it.
When displayed either horizontally or
vertically against a wall, the union (star
field) should be in the uppermost corner
and to the flags own right, that is, to the
observerís left. When displayed in a
window, the flags should be displayed the
same way, with the union or blue field to
the left of the observer in the street.
When the U.S. flag is displayed on a
pole projecting from a building, the union
of the flag should be placed at the peak of
the staff unless the flag is at half staff.
When suspended from a rope extending
from a building on a pole, the flag should
be hoisted out union first from the
building.
When flags of states, cities or localities,
or pennants of societies are flown on the
same halyard with the flag of the United
States, the latter should always be at the
peak.
When the flags are flown from adjacent
staffs, the flag of the United States should
be hoisted first and lowered last. No such
flag or pennant may be placed above the
flag of the United States or to the United
States flagís right.
Always hoist the U.S. flag briskly.
Lower it ceremoniously.
The flag, when flown at half-staff,
should be first hoisted to the peak for an
instant and then lowered to the half-staff
position. The flag should be again raised
to the peak before it us lowered for the
day.
When the U.S. flag is in such condition
that it is no longer a fitting emblem for
display, it should be destroyed in a
dignified way, preferably via flag disposal
ceremonies held at your local VFW or
American Legion Posts.
Important Doníts
It is generally not desirable to fly the
flag outdoors when the weather is
particularly inclement because exposure to
severe winds and rain may damage the
flag.
Never in any way should disrespect be
shown the U.S. flag.
The U.S. flag should never be displayed
with the union down except as a signal of
dire distress in instances of extreme danger
to life or property.
The U.S. flag should never touch
anything beneath it.
Never use the U.S. flag as wearing
apparel, bedding or drapery, festooned,
drawn back, nor up, in folds.

IP:

Irascible
Member
posted October 02, 2001 01:58 AM            
Just replying so you know someone read it and found it interesting. Don't know about you, but I feel a bit rejected when no one replies to my threads....
.... and I don't take rejection well ....

IP:

coax
Administrator
posted October 02, 2001 03:09 PM            
thank ras. I didn't think anyone would reply theres nothing to really apply to, but I like it when people do reply

I found this somewhere and thought i'd put it up.

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LDA Players, Information, and etc...


IP:

Sailor
Administrator
posted October 08, 2001 02:10 PM            
You did a great job Coax in finding that information. That is part of the rules that I lived by in the Navy since my job was being a Signalman (worked with all the flags including the stars and stripes). Sorry I did not see this until now, but again you did a great job - congratulations!!!

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May you always have a following Sea and the comfort of those you hold nearest to your heart.

IP:

BamZipPow
Member
posted October 21, 2001 05:36 PM            
Thanks coax,

Good post. I think the rules of the flag is actually in the US Code 10. Not sure...you know how us USAF types are.

BamZipPow
...how things get fragged

IP: