|
Author Topic:   New to Programming in C and Visual C++
Romanator
Member
posted April 02, 2000 01:24 PM            
I thought that I would submit something new to the bulletin board.
My background is electronic simulators but I am sharpening my skills in C and VC++, and I am quite interested in the visual aspect of programming. Ray tracing, particles etc. Are there any good books out there or CDs that could explain OpenGL, particle theory and ray tracing etc. or is university a must?
I have a day job and taking off several years would be extreme.
Also, there seems to be a debate over using Borland or Microsoft Visual C++ 6.
Any ideas?

------------------
Roman

IP:

Kaeto
Member
posted April 02, 2000 04:28 PM            
There are a bunch of older threads that answer some your questions... check 'em out!

IP:

Romanator
Member
posted April 03, 2000 06:59 PM            
Thank you. I will check them out.

------------------
Roman

IP:

CheshireCat
Member
posted April 04, 2000 04:13 PM            
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0201604582/o/qid=954879052/sr=2-1/102-4544793-2112825

The standard book for learning OpenGL.

Also, I use both Borland's environment, and MSDev (Borland for some old 16-bit projects at work), and prefer MSDev due to what I feel is a more mature UI. There are a lot of intuitive, time saving features built into MS's developement evironment that I noew take for granted =]

IP:

Romanator
Member
posted April 04, 2000 05:41 PM            
Hi,

Thank you for responding. There are a lot of books to choose from. I still consider myself a novice user. I think that I should go through all of the rudimentary books but the OpenGL book looks very interesting.I'll keep reading and checking the message board.

------------------
Roman

[This message has been edited by Romanator (edited April 04, 2000).]

IP:

Klaus Hartmann
Member
posted April 04, 2000 10:44 PM            
Roman,

I normally use Direct3D, but a couple of month ago I suddenly had to use OpenGL, and I didn't know anything about OpenGL. I then bought the book that CheshireCat already recommended, because it is *the* recommended book for OpenGL. It's absolutely easy to understand, and still contains some information that is even interesting to more experienced programmers. For me, it was like this: The book arrived, and I was able to use OpenGL the same day (only the features I needed). My first OpenGL program was a CLOD terrain engine, and I didn't run into any serious problems... thanks to that book.

Niki

IP:

Romanator
Member
posted April 05, 2000 06:22 AM            
It sounds like a great book. I think I'll order it. Also, I understand that there is an OpenGL web page.

------------------
Roman

IP:

Klaus Hartmann
Member
posted April 05, 2000 09:19 AM            
Yes, there is a web page: http://www.opengl.org

IP: